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    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Author: Grant Gisondo

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Articles posted by Grant Gisondo (Page 2)

    Florida Procedures For Custody of a Minor Child by an Extended Family Member

    Unfortunately, there are many times when neither parent can care for their minor child. Reasons are numerous and can include death, ill health, mental problems resulting in abuse, drug addiction resulting in abuse and neglect, desertion, and incarnation. Sadly, the numbers of these children being cared for by a family member, most often grandparents, is in the millions. Studies showed in 2018, there were 2,733 000 minor children living with family members other than their parents. Each state has its own set of guidelines and requirements for the legal ordering of custody for minor children, which can be found in...

    How to Live with Your Spouse While Going Through a Divorce

    Living with a spouse while going through a divorce is rarely an easy thing to do. To begin with, the very fact you and your spouse have deemed your marriage irrevocably broken means you no longer desire to be together permanently. This being said, it would not usually be the desire of a couple to continue to live together in the same home. In most instances, each party has his or her own residence while going through a divorce and most certainly after the divorce is finalized. Occasionally, however, some circumstances make it necessary for a couple to continue to...

    What is Simplified Dissolution in Florida?

    For many years the courts used the term “divorce” to signify the legal ending of a marriage. In those days, there needed to be reasons a marriage could be terminated, such as adultery, misconduct, and emotional or physical abuse. A reason for divorce had to be proven before a court would end a marriage. As time has gone on, however, there have been radical changes in how a marriage can be legally terminated. In many states, including Florida, the term “divorce” has been replaced by the term “dissolution of marriage.” In many states, including Florida, there need be no reason...

    Social Media Posts and Photos Can Be Used Against You in Court

    Social media, the blessing, and curse of the modern world. YouTube, Facebook, Tumbler, Twitter, Snapchat, Instant Messenger, Linkedin, Instagram, and Pinterest are examples of social media options. It is amazing to be able to talk with and see people around the world. You can take videos of activities, people, and just about anything the mind can think up. Information is non-ending, and music and art abound. Authors Marisa A. Tradatti and Anna C. Horevay  write, “There is a whole generation of people for whom tweeting is as natural as breathing, for whom the word ‘friend’ has become a verb and...

    What is a Retainer? Why Do I Have to Pay One?

    A retainer, in the legal sense, is an up-front fee paid by a potential client to ‘’retain” or hold the time and expenses an attorney may need to litigate a case properly. The definition of payment by retainer provided by the Legal Information Institute is “A fee that the client pays up-front to an attorney before the attorney has begun work for the client.” A specific outcome is not guaranteed, but rather the attorney will be working on the client’s behalf until an outcome is reached. There are three types of retainers: Retaining fee: an up-front retaining fee held by...

    How Might Virtual Learning and Working from Home Affect Shared Parenting and Child Support?

    Due to the COVID pandemic, working from home and virtual learning has now been in effect for many months and, in some areas, is still an everyday occurrence. In fact, some soothsayers are predicting that this change in the way we live is becoming the new norm. In many instances, schools and businesses are finding it financially beneficial to keep doors closed, and students and employees studying and working from home. For some, this change in venue is welcomed, but for many, especially those who depend on parenting plans and child support, there are and will continue to be possible...

    What Should You Bring to Your Initial Consultation?

    To better understand what you should bring to your initial consultation, it Is necessary to understand what an initial consultation with an attorney is designed to accomplish. There are several things to consider: An initial consultation is not a time when an attorney will be giving direct advice involving your potential case. Instead, it a time for you to present the reasons you need an attorney and for the attorney to listen and make suggestions as to how he or she can be of help in getting you the outcome you hope for. As no one can know the mind...

    Why an Attorney Will Not Give You Legal Advice in a FREE Consultation

    When considering this question, the first thing to clarify is the difference between advice and information. Advice: as defined by online Find Law states, “Legal advice refers to the written or oral counsel about a legal matter that would affect the rights and responsibilities of the person receiving the advice. In addition, actual legal advice requires careful analysis of the law as it applies to a person’s specific situation—as opposed for speculation based on generic facts.” Here an attorney would learn the specific facts of a client’s case and do research to determine how best to proceed. Often just getting ready...

    What to Know When a Minor Child Must Fly to Visit Parents in Different States During COVID

    Life must go on even during the current COVID pandemic. This life includes the timesharing orders between parents of minor children. When it is nice if both parents live in the same geographical area, it today’s transient society, it often happens that parents live miles and sometimes states apart. As most parental timesharing plans include instructions on allowing minor children to visit, even when many miles separate them, it is important to understand how a minor child can fly between parents. If a minor child needs to fly without an accompanying adult, the child is considered an unaccompanied minor, and...

    Co-parenting Post COVID

    In Florida, co-parenting is referred to as parental timesharing. A couple who has natural or adopted minor children (children from birth to age l8 or a child who cannot support themselves for mental or physical reasons) and decides to divorce, separate from a cohabitation relationship, or hasn’t lived together, will be required by Family Law Courts to share the care and nurturing of their children. Florida Family Law is built around the motto “in the best interests of the child.” As research has shown children, develop better with the influence of both parents, and parental timesharing has resulted. A parenting...

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.