Contact
Law Offices of Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. Logo

(561) 530-4568

Call For Free Consultation

9:00-5:00 M-F

Saturday Appointments Available

Quick Contact

    Please prove you are human by selecting the Plane.

    Copyright © 2019 Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.
    Family Law Attorney
    All Rights Reserved.

    9:00-5:00 M-F

    Saturday Appointments Available

    (561) 530-4568

    Call For Free Consultation

    Facebook

    Google+

    Linkedin

    YouTube

    Search
    Menu
    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Legal Blog

    Legal information, news, and more

    How to Have a Valid Marriage in the State of Florida

    Deciding to enter into the commitment of marriage is an exciting time in a couple’s relationship. Once the decision to take this step has been made, there is a set procedure to make a marriage legally binding and acceptable. Though similar, each state has its guidelines and regulations for obtaining a valid marriage. However, before outlining the steps to take to have a valid marriage in the state of Florida, there are some facts pertaining to a Florida marriage which are important to understand. Each party must be 18 years of age or older to enter into marriage without parental...

    How to Efficiently Communicate with Your Attorney

    Communication, likely one of the most important social skills related to the human (and animal) species, is not something a person should take casually or for granted. How to use speech, emotions, and body language to effectively share information between two or more persons becomes a powerful tool, whether for a positive or a negative outcome. Such concerns as taking into account the communication style of those listening, finding empathy with the listener, and hearing what the listener has to say in return are all necessary components of efficient communication. And, efficient communication with your attorney is vitally necessary if...

    Why Reading Your Retainer/Fee Agreement is Important

    Like any document requiring your signature, you should always read all the papers needing your attention. You should even read the small print as there can be some tricky points hidden there. And, reading an attorney’s retainer/fee agreement is no exception. This blog will take a look at why it is important to read the retainer/fee agreement but first understanding what a retainer/fee agreement is will help to explain the importance of reading it in its entirety. According to the online definition of a legal retainer, ”A retainer is an advance payment that a client makes to his or her...

    What Happens When You Don’t Follow Your Lawyer’s Advice?

    As with any professional whom you seek out and retain for advice, and in the case of an attorney, representation on a legal matter, it is wise to follow the advice given. Before retaining the professional, you should feel confident he or she knows about and has experience in the field of expertise you need. In the case of a lawyer, you can check on his or her website and contact the state Bar for information. On the website, you can determine the educational background, years of experience, services offered, areas of representation, marital status, community involvement, professional awards, and...

    How to Dress for the Courtroom

    Dress for success. This can be said emphatically for those who are having their day in court, be it attorney, client, or witness. So often, people form judgments based almost entirely on their first impression of another person and can be a plus or a minus depending on the opinion formed. For example, should a client be dressed in poorly fitting, unpressed clothes with unshined shoes to match or an attorney dressed in a suit that doesn’t quite button over the midsection, a judge or jury could form the opinion of the person not being serious about the issues at...

    How Mediation Can Bring Your Case to a Close Faster and Cheaper

    Mediation, defined by Florida’s. Nineteenth Circuit Court—Family Mediation Program “is a process in which two people work together with a neutral third person (the mediator) to discuss the issues in their case and try to work them out. Mediation often occurs with both people in the same room.” In Florida, mediation in the Family Law courts is, for most jurisdictions, a requirement for a couple seeking dissolution of marriage (divorce) or modification of child support, timesharing, parenting plan, and alimony (the types which can be modified). Many of those seeking a divorce think the step of mediation is an unnecessary...

    Does Infidelity Affect Alimony?

    The answer to the question, “Does infidelity affect alimony?” is “yes.” But why is this so when at least in Florida which is a no-fault divorce state there does not have to be a reason for granting a divorce (now termed dissolution of marriage) other than the desire of one of the parties to end the marriage? Taking a look at the words infidelity and alimony with the additional observation of how infidelity can affect the award of alimony will help answer the question under consideration. Infidelity: As defined by Wikipedia (synonyms include: cheating, straying, adultery {when married}, being unfaithful or...

    Did You Know? The Court Must Approve All Parenting Plans

    All parenting plans in the state of Florida must be approved by the court. This fact is important as not only must the parenting plan be approved by the judge when shared parenting, parental timesharing case is heard in court but also when a parenting plan is part of a marital agreement signed following a mediation. Parenting plans created during mediation are usually accepted as written, but a judge does have the right to make changes as he or she deems necessary. A parenting plan is a written plan to determine how a number of issues involving the care and nurturing...

    What is a No-Fault Divorce?

    According to Wikipedia, the definition of no-fault divorce is “a divorce in which the dissolution of a marriage does not require a showing of wrongdoing by either party. Laws providing for no-fault divorce allow a family court to grant a divorce in response to a petition by either party of the marriage without requiring the petitioner to provide evidence that the defendant has committed a breach of the marital contract.’ For many years there needed to be a reason such as proven adultery, abuse, abandonment, or mental cruelty for a couple to obtain a divorce. Now, in every state, including Washington...

    Fla. Stat. 61.13 child custody factors

    In Florida the term “child custody” is not used except in special cases such as when a parent is in jail, a parent cannot care for a minor child due to severe mental or physical illness, a parent has been adjudicated guilty of child abuse, sexual abuse, or domestic violence, or a parent has an active history of drug or alcohol abuse. If one or both parents are found to have the above strikes against them, then Family Court will give full care “custody” to the non-offending parent. If both parents are proven unable to care for the minor child,...

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.