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    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    divorce in florida Tag

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Posts tagged "divorce in florida"

    Florida is an Equitable Distribution State. What Does That Mean?

    One of the most difficult issues to mediate or for a judge to rule on is the division of assets and liabilities. In other words, how will marital monies, properties, businesses, and debts be divided between the two spouses? In some states, Oregon, Nevada, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, California, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and Louisianna, all assets and liabilities coming under the heading of “marital” that are obtained since the marriage will be divided evenly or, as often termed, equally. These states are sometimes referred to as common property states. All the rest of the states (except Alaska, where a couple can...

    The Importance of a Guardian Ad Litem in a Dissolution Case

    To start, it is important to understand the terms referenced in the title, “The Importance of a Guardian Ad-Litem in a Dissolution Case.” Guardian Ad Litem Is a trained person whom a court may appoint to look into solutions that are in the best interest of the child. In Florida, the motto of Family Court is “in the best interest of the child,” which basically means, after determining the needs of the minor child, to put the needs of the minor child first before the needs of the parents. To quote from Google: “ Best interest determinations are generally made by...

    Calculating the Marital Portion of Nonmarital Property When Marital Money Was Used to Pay Down the Principal Note and Mortgage

    One of the confusing issues that sometimes accompanies a divorce proceeding is calculating the marital portion of nonmarital property when marital money was used to pay down the principal note and mortgage. In other words, when one party has been buying a home with their own funds prior to the marriage, the home is considered nonmarital as it was purchased before the marriage. However, following the marriage, both parties pay toward the mortgage and principal. Monies gained following the marriage are considered marital funds, and in a divorce, the settlement will be calculated as such. In Florida, Family Law Statute...

    20 Factors the Court Considers in Order Timesharing with a Minor Child

    In Florida, when it is determined that biological or legally adoptive parents are fit physically, mentally, and have not been convicted of child abuse or domestic violence, or are incarcerated, the care and nurturing of minor children (children birth through eighteen or longer if a child cannot support themselves) will be granted by a timesharing order. There are 20 factors that the court considers when drawing up the timesharing order. These factors are all contained in Florida’s Statute 61:13. The following paraphrase for each factor will help you understand how a judge will look at each timesharing situation. Show parents...

    Mediation can be a Win, Win for Both Parties

    In many states, including Florida, mediation is required for most cases before the case can be scheduled for a court date. This is done for a variety of reasons which, in the end, if mediation is successful, can be a win, win for both parties. Mediation is where both parties and their attorneys try to agree on the outcome of the case in question. A trained mediator, often an attorney, will keep the conversations on track and remind the parties how important it is to seriously consider compromise in order to resolve the issues. Taking a look, for example, at...

    Do You Need an Attorney to Represent You?

    Attorneys cost money, and rightly so. They have spent years getting a legal education and then passing stiff state exams in order to practice law. And, if that isn't enough, attorneys must continually keep mindful of ever changing laws and regulations. Too, there is the expense of an office, a staff, and the myriad of expectations put on an attorney socially as well as professionally. Most people like to keep as much money as they can, so when it comes to legal matters, there is a great temptation to omit the use of an attorney and go it alone. Sometimes this...

    Tips to Prepare for Your Day in Court

    Going to court is often a scary thought, especially when you really have to go to court. Depending on your personal ability to handle stress can make a difference. There are, however, several tips for even the self-assured person to consider as he or she prepares for their day in court. Probably the most important tip is to make sure you understand what you and your attorney hope to achieve. In other words, what outcomes are you looking for, and what strategy does your attorney plan to take. Just letting your attorney fly alone can be a let-down if you...

    Does Divorce Have to be Filed in the Same State as Where the Marriage Took Place?

    No, a divorce does not have to be filed in the same state as where the marriage took place. In fact, you would file for a divorce in the state in which you are a resident. But be careful, states have different requirements for establishing and claiming residency for a divorce, and sometimes counties within a state have their own resident requirements as well. Some states have several ways to establish residency for divorce, but most states have a basic amount of time as the requirement. The proof of residency requirements can be for the person filing for divorce, or...

    What if My Spouse “Won’t Give Me a Divorce”?

    There was a time, and in a few states, it is still true, if a couple wanted to get a divorce there must be a proven reason such as infidelity, abuse, abandonment, or mental cruelty. In Florida, for example, this is no longer the way divorce works. Now, if only one person in the couple wants a divorce, or dissolution of marriage as it is now termed, the court will grant their request. Florida is what is termed a “no-fault state.” While this sounds simplistic, it does not mean a person can just file for a divorce and get one without...

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.