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    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Family Law Courts Tag

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Posts tagged "Family Law Courts" (Page 2)

    20 Factors the Court Considers in Order Timesharing with a Minor Child

    In Florida, when it is determined that biological or legally adoptive parents are fit physically, mentally, and have not been convicted of child abuse or domestic violence, or are incarcerated, the care and nurturing of minor children (children birth through eighteen or longer if a child cannot support themselves) will be granted by a timesharing order. There are 20 factors that the court considers when drawing up the timesharing order. These factors are all contained in Florida’s Statute 61:13. The following paraphrase for each factor will help you understand how a judge will look at each timesharing situation. Show parents...

    Mediation can be a Win, Win for Both Parties

    In many states, including Florida, mediation is required for most cases before the case can be scheduled for a court date. This is done for a variety of reasons which, in the end, if mediation is successful, can be a win, win for both parties. Mediation is where both parties and their attorneys try to agree on the outcome of the case in question. A trained mediator, often an attorney, will keep the conversations on track and remind the parties how important it is to seriously consider compromise in order to resolve the issues. Taking a look, for example, at...

    Do You Need an Attorney to Represent You?

    Attorneys cost money, and rightly so. They have spent years getting a legal education and then passing stiff state exams in order to practice law. And, if that isn't enough, attorneys must continually keep mindful of ever changing laws and regulations. Too, there is the expense of an office, a staff, and the myriad of expectations put on an attorney socially as well as professionally. Most people like to keep as much money as they can, so when it comes to legal matters, there is a great temptation to omit the use of an attorney and go it alone. Sometimes this...

    Tips to Prepare for Your Day in Court

    Going to court is often a scary thought, especially when you really have to go to court. Depending on your personal ability to handle stress can make a difference. There are, however, several tips for even the self-assured person to consider as he or she prepares for their day in court. Probably the most important tip is to make sure you understand what you and your attorney hope to achieve. In other words, what outcomes are you looking for, and what strategy does your attorney plan to take. Just letting your attorney fly alone can be a let-down if you...

    What to Know When a Minor Child Must Fly to Visit Parents in Different States During COVID

    Life must go on even during the current COVID pandemic. This life includes the timesharing orders between parents of minor children. When it is nice if both parents live in the same geographical area, it today’s transient society, it often happens that parents live miles and sometimes states apart. As most parental timesharing plans include instructions on allowing minor children to visit, even when many miles separate them, it is important to understand how a minor child can fly between parents. If a minor child needs to fly without an accompanying adult, the child is considered an unaccompanied minor, and...

    Co-parenting Post COVID

    In Florida, co-parenting is referred to as parental timesharing. A couple who has natural or adopted minor children (children from birth to age l8 or a child who cannot support themselves for mental or physical reasons) and decides to divorce, separate from a cohabitation relationship, or hasn’t lived together, will be required by Family Law Courts to share the care and nurturing of their children. Florida Family Law is built around the motto “in the best interests of the child.” As research has shown children, develop better with the influence of both parents, and parental timesharing has resulted. A parenting...

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.