Contact
Law Offices of Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. Logo

(561) 530-4568

Call For Free Consultation

9:00-5:00 M-F

Saturday Appointments Available

Quick Contact

    Please prove you are human by selecting the Cup.

    Copyright © 2019 Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.
    Family Law Attorney
    All Rights Reserved.

    9:00-5:00 M-F

    Saturday Appointments Available

    (561) 530-4568

    Call For Free Consultation

    Facebook

    Google+

    Linkedin

    YouTube

    Search
    Menu
    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Parental timesharing Tag

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Posts tagged "Parental timesharing"

    20 Factors the Court Considers in Order Timesharing with a Minor Child

    In Florida, when it is determined that biological or legally adoptive parents are fit physically, mentally, and have not been convicted of child abuse or domestic violence, or are incarcerated, the care and nurturing of minor children (children birth through eighteen or longer if a child cannot support themselves) will be granted by a timesharing order. There are 20 factors that the court considers when drawing up the timesharing order. These factors are all contained in Florida’s Statute 61:13. The following paraphrase for each factor will help you understand how a judge will look at each timesharing situation. Show parents...

    Tips to Prepare for Your Day in Court

    Going to court is often a scary thought, especially when you really have to go to court. Depending on your personal ability to handle stress can make a difference. There are, however, several tips for even the self-assured person to consider as he or she prepares for their day in court. Probably the most important tip is to make sure you understand what you and your attorney hope to achieve. In other words, what outcomes are you looking for, and what strategy does your attorney plan to take. Just letting your attorney fly alone can be a let-down if you...

    Support Without Dissolution Under Florida Statute 61.09

    Dissolution of marriage, i.e., divorce, is usually the vehicle that a spouse uses to receive child support and or alimony. However, there are instances when financial support is needed and rightfully deserved, but the needful party does not want a divorce. In such an instance, each state has its statutes defining how family law will be carried out. In Florida, there is a statute, number 61.09, which states, “If a person having the ability to contribute to the maintenance of his or her spouse and support of his or her minor child fails to do so, the spouse who is...

    Is Your Case Ripe for a Modification? Here are the Standards You Must Satisfy

    As with many situations in life, circumstances change as time goes on. This is true of court-ordered spousal support (alimony), child support, and time-sharing. When either party finds him or herself in a position where they think there is a need for modification, Florida Family Courts have very definite standards in place. Obtaining a modification is not easy, but it can be done. The following guidelines will help you decide if your situation will qualify for a hoped-for modification. However, it is always best to seek the advice and help of an experienced Family Law Attorney when seeking a modification...

    Why an Attorney Will Not Give You Legal Advice in a FREE Consultation

    When considering this question, the first thing to clarify is the difference between advice and information. Advice: as defined by online Find Law states, “Legal advice refers to the written or oral counsel about a legal matter that would affect the rights and responsibilities of the person receiving the advice. In addition, actual legal advice requires careful analysis of the law as it applies to a person’s specific situation—as opposed for speculation based on generic facts.” Here an attorney would learn the specific facts of a client’s case and do research to determine how best to proceed. Often just getting ready...

    What to Know When a Minor Child Must Fly to Visit Parents in Different States During COVID

    Life must go on even during the current COVID pandemic. This life includes the timesharing orders between parents of minor children. When it is nice if both parents live in the same geographical area, it today’s transient society, it often happens that parents live miles and sometimes states apart. As most parental timesharing plans include instructions on allowing minor children to visit, even when many miles separate them, it is important to understand how a minor child can fly between parents. If a minor child needs to fly without an accompanying adult, the child is considered an unaccompanied minor, and...

    Co-parenting Post COVID

    In Florida, co-parenting is referred to as parental timesharing. A couple who has natural or adopted minor children (children from birth to age l8 or a child who cannot support themselves for mental or physical reasons) and decides to divorce, separate from a cohabitation relationship, or hasn’t lived together, will be required by Family Law Courts to share the care and nurturing of their children. Florida Family Law is built around the motto “in the best interests of the child.” As research has shown children, develop better with the influence of both parents, and parental timesharing has resulted. A parenting...

    Trial Can Be a Legal Roulette

    You never know what a judge will rule! This is so true when it comes to the final decision a judge will make concerning a case. Taking a divorce handled in Family Court in Florida, for example, a judge must rule on many issues. While there are guidelines in the Florida Statutes for divorce, it is up to a judge to decide how best to apply the guidelines to each situation. Some of the areas a judge must rule on include: Alimony: there are six types in Florida, each with its own set of qualifications. A judge must decide if alimony...

    Meaning of Continuity of a Stable, Satisfactory Environment Regarding Timesharing

    Parental timesharing for minor children has, in most states, including Florida, replaced the practice of custody for minor children where there is a primary or residential parent and a secondary or nonresidential parent. Over the years of experience and research, it has been proven that children develop to their best potential when they are cared for and nurtured by both parents. Unfortunately, in perhaps the majority of families in the US, both parents are not together whether in marriage or a living arrangement. The practice of primary and secondary custody simply does not allow a child equal access to and...

    Preparing for the Holiday Timesharing-Review

    It’s hard to believe that another year, particularly such a difficult one, is fast approaching what is called the “holiday season.” These special times of celebration include Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. All these events are traditionally family-oriented, and children play a large part in the celebrations. All ages of children, young and old, usually participate, but those children under the age of l8 and those unable to provide for themselves due to physical or mental challenges, have a particularly important role to play. And, of course, it is not unusual for both parents to want to spend these...

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.