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Managing Stress and Anxiety During a Family Law Case

Home > Divorce Law News  > Managing Stress and Anxiety During a Family Law Case

Managing Stress and Anxiety During a Family Law Case

Family Law Case

Managing stress and anxiety during a family law case can become a serious issue. Depending on the type of case will, to a certain extent, determine the level of stress and anxiety and the manner in which they are handled. If minor children are involved the level of concern is higher and the need for careful planning for managing stress and anxiety increases. Looking at some of the most frequent family law cases can help with managing techniques.

Divorce or as it is now called, Dissolution of Marriage: In most cases the emotional involvement of both parties is high. This is especially true if one party does not want the divorce stands to lose a great deal in terms of standard of living including their place on the social register. Fear of the uncertainty for their future and anger for being betrayed bring huge amounts of stress and anxiety. It is best if a person can accept the reality of their situation and, with the help of a competent family Law attorney work toward the best outcome possible. If the marriage can be successfully dissolved during mediation, it is so much the better. A great deal of stress is ended when a marital settlement, designed by the parties together, is accomplished. The extra wait, the higher cost, and the realization that a complete stranger, the judge, will decide one’s future is difficult to handle in the best of circumstances. And, if minor children are involved, there is the additional need for their care during and after the divorce which adds to stress and anxiety. Keeping busy with positive activities, making new friends, seeing a family counselor, and trying to get along with rather than trying to hurt or anger the spouse works wonders with reducing stress and anxiety. Getting advice from a professional money manager can also help calm the fears and frustrations of how to manage on your own.

Child support and Parental Time Sharing: These cases occur during divorce proceedings but also separately when the parents have never married or even lived together. Too, both these issues can be modified after the final decision is given. As minor children are always involved in these cases, it becomes vitally important to address their stress and anxiety as well as your own. Children respond to the environment around them, so if you are overly emotional, they will pick up on this and become increasingly upset. Another factor so often a part of these legal issues is the bad-mouthing or put-down of the “other” parent. Children love both parents and should not be made to feel a parent is bad or doesn’t love them. Keep your differences with the other parent between the two of you. Let children feel loved by both parents and take time with them in enjoyable activities. If there is a “new love” in the picture, allow time for children to get to know this person and don’t make comparisons to the other parent as being “better than” or “worse than.” Take the stress and anxiety temperature of your children as you would their body temperature. If you can talk with them, hear their feelings and concerns, and be as reassuring as possible there will be pleasant outcomes in the future. Even if the other parent is behind on child support or not doing as the timesharing parenting plan orders, try to keep this information from worrying the children.

Anxiety and stress are, unfortunately, an inevitable outcome of most family law cases. Taking care of oneself by eating well, getting plenty of sleep, seeing friends, going to counseling, involving oneself in hobbies, and having a positive outlook, will make a big difference in the stress and anxiety levels of both the children and adults involved in these situations.