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    500 Village square crossing, #103 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Protect Your Attorney-Client Privilege

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Board Certified Lawyer  > Protect Your Attorney-Client Privilege

    Protect Your Attorney-Client Privilege

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    According to the online Legal Information Institute, the definition for attorney-client privilege is as follows:” Attorney-client privilege refers to a legal privilege that works to keep confidential communications between his or her attorney secret. This privilege is asserted in the face of a legal demand for the communications, such as a discovery request or a demand that the lawyer testify under oath.” It is often necessary for a lawyer to ask very personal questions in order to create a case that is true and viable. For example, if a client has been evading certain taxes, a lawyer needs to know as the opposing party could find out and use the information against the lawyer’s client. If the client’s lawyer did not know about the tax evasion, they would not be prepared to handle the fact. However, with attorney-client privilege, the lawyer is not obligated to report the information to the IRS or reveal it to anyone else.

    Because the information shared between client and attorney needs to be protected, a client needs to take precautions to protect what is said. Here are some considerations to help keep attorney-client information confidential.

    • It is best not to bring anyone else with you when having an in-office consultation with your attorney. Unless you have trouble hearing or need an interpreter, it is best to come alone. You might argue that your best friend would never repeat what was said, but throughout the case, a best friend may no longer be a best friend. When this happens, the former best friend may decide to join the opposing party’s side and reveal all they know.
    • Don’t discuss the conversations between you and your attorney with anyone. Again, someone you are sure will not repeat what you tell them can turn fickle and pass along information that needs to stay confidential.
    • You should refrain from texting, emailing, or using social media to report on what was said with your attorney. In today’s world of the ease of hacking, anyone with the know-how can learn what information you have posted.
    • You can take notes during a conversation with your attorney but make sure the information you write down is kept in a place where others won’t run across it.
    • If you correspond with someone, keep all confidential exchanges between you and your attorney out of the correspondence. Letters can be destroyed, but they can also be read by others, and the person receiving the letter can pass along information as well.

    Once words have been spoken, they can’t be returned. Your attorney is well aware of the need for attorney-client privilege and will honor that responsibility. You need to take the responsibility seriously as well. Sometimes it takes just a few slipped words to a friend or colleague to destroy the case your attorney is building on your behalf. “Zip the lip” is a good motto to practice while your legal case is being litigated.

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.