Contact
Law Offices of Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. Logo

(561) 530-4568

Call For Free Consultation

9:00-5:00 M-F

Saturday Appointments Available

Quick Contact

    Please prove you are human by selecting the Heart.

    Copyright © 2019 Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.
    Family Law Attorney
    All Rights Reserved.

    9:00-5:00 M-F

    Saturday Appointments Available

    (561) 530-4568

    Call For Free Consultation

    Facebook

    Google+

    Linkedin

    YouTube

    Search
    Menu
    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. – Family Law Attorney

    Why it is Imperative to Follow Your Lawyers Advice

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A. > Attorney Consultation  > Why it is Imperative to Follow Your Lawyers Advice

    Why it is Imperative to Follow Your Lawyers Advice

    Divorce attorney Imperative to Follow Your Lawyers Advice

    To begin with, you have likely taken time to investigate several lawyers before you settled on the lawyer who will be handling your case. Such considerations as education, mission statements, years in practice, extra credentials such as Licensed Supreme Court Certified Civil Mediator, and in Florida, Bar Board Certified all make for a legal professional well qualified to litigate on your behalf. If the lawyer you choose offered a free, initial, in-office consultation, you will have an idea of his or her personality and an understanding of the fee schedule. Taking all this into consideration, you should have little trouble following your lawyer’s advice. But sometimes, as the case moves along, a client with think they know best and decide to make decisions and choices in opposition to their lawyer. This is unwise.

    To begin with, your lawyer is in a position to know the laws pertaining to your case right up to the present rules, laws, and guidelines. You may think you know more than your lawyer, but that is highly unlikely. If you decide to go off on your own, you can anger your lawyer and even cause time and money to be wasted as your lawyer tries to fix the mistakes you have created. For example, if you are told not to use e-mail or social media to communicate information about your case, post pictures of romantic flings, or brag about financial gains, and you do anyway, your emails and posts can be traced by the opposition and important information leaked to them. Even if a state is no-fault, if it can be proven marital funds were used inappropriately, the aggrieved party may receive increased alimony.

    There are several times during litigation when a lawyer will need to ask questions and or have you fill out paperwork such as in-depth financials, interrogatories, and depositions. Your lawyer will impress the importance of telling the truth and not hide information or facts. Should you decide not to follow your lawyer’s advice in this matter, and you are found out, your case will be severely damaged. A judge will not stand for deceit. In fact, if wrongdoing is determined following the final judgment, a party can return to court for appropriate compensation.

    Lawyers have emotions as you do, and when their advice is not listened to, they can become upset and even angry. A lawyer wants to put their best representation to use in mediation and court before a judge. If there is a strained relationship between a lawyer and their client, it can affect how a judge will view the case. And, if a lawyer feels their client is not cooperating to an unfair degree, he or she can remove themselves from the case, and the client will have to find another lawyer. Changing lawyers midstream is costly both in time and money.

    Most lawyers are anxious to represent a client in the finest way possible. A client should respect the knowledge and understanding their lawyer demonstrates and be willing to listen and cooperate. Ask questions if you have concerns and listen to the answers. Tell the truth at all times. Remember, a lawyer had to study for many years, pass a bar exam and continue to take courses each year. He or she wants to provide good legal advice, and you must do your part by being a good listener and following that advice.

    Grant J. Gisondo, P.A.